Useful Information for Members

 

A.  Emergency Contact:  

Telephone 000 for:

-       Police

-       Ambulance

-       Fire brigade

Calls to 000 are free.

Be prepared to say:

-       Your name

-       Where you are

-       The telephone number you are calling from


B.  New Immigrants: First Things First

Top 10 things to do as soon as possible upon arrival in Australia.

Click on the links provided for more information.


1.          Apply for a Tax File Number (TFN)

To receive an income in Australia, you need a TFN.

https://www.ato.gov.au/Forms/TFN---application-for-individuals/

2.          Register with Medicare

The Australian Government provides help with basic medical expenses through a scheme called Medicare.

http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/enablers/online-services/register

3.          Open a bank account

In Australia, most income including salary and government benefits are paid directly into a bank account.

There are 4 "big banks" and many other smaller banks in Australia. Please browse the websites and then visit your nearest branch for friendly and professional advice.

4.          Register with Centrelink  

Centre link is a government agency which delivers a range of services to the community.

https://www.centrelink.gov.au/wps/portal/clk_common/CROSS#stay

5.          Enrol Your Children in School

Under Australian law, children must attend school until they are 15 years old.
Search the profiles of almost 10,000 Australian schools, find and compare their resources and performance.

http://www.myschool.edu.au/

6.          Find your General Practitioner (Doctor)

Find out in advance, your closest Medical Centre using the search engine:  

https://healthengine.com.au/findapractitioner.php

7.          Apply for a Driver's Licence

Information on getting a driver's licence (NSW):  

http://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/roads/licence/driver/

8.          Organise Child Care for your children

Find information on different types of child care, child care assistance and find child care centres in your local area using this online child care portal. 

http://www.mychild.gov.au/sites/mychild

9.          Read information on Skillmax (for Jobseekers)

This is a course tailored especially for skilled migrants seeking employment in their chosen profession. It focuses on successful job seeking strategies.

http://ames.edu.au/courses/programs-for-migrants/skillmax-jobseekers

10.       Register with KAA

Become a KAA Member and find a family in your new home town - Welcome to KAA!

www.konkani.org.au/membership TO BE CHANGED


C.   Living In Australia: One Stop Shop

This excellent site created by the Australian Government, gives you a lot of  vital information you will need:

http://www.australia.gov.au/people/families

 

D.  Prayer and Worship

-       Murugan Temple, Sydney:

http://www.sydneymurugan.org.au/murugan2/

-       Sri Venkateswara Temple:

Helensburgh: http://www.svtsydney.org/

-       Shree Shirdi Sai Sansthan, Sydney:

http://www.shirdisai.org.au/

-       Shree Mukti Gupteshwar Temple, Sydney:

http://www.muktigupteshwar.org/

 

E.   Telephone numbers

-       Calls to telephone numbers beginning with 1800 are free if you ring from a private telephone and cost the same as a local call from a payphone.

-       Numbers beginning with 13 or 1300 are charged at local call rates. Some 1300 and 1800 numbers can be used only from outside the capital city.

-       Mobile phone rates apply to calls from mobile phones.  


F.   Budgeting Tips

-       Three  months living expenses while you are looking for employment.

-       Rental Bond and Rent in Advance: could be up to 4 weeks in total - varies by state.

-       Vehicles: Purchase, inspection, transfer fees, licence fees, insurance.

-       Driver’s  Licence.

-       Police clearance required for many non-professional jobs.

-       Mobile Phone, Broadband connection

-       Pay TV (broadcast TV is free)

-       School uniform and School fees.


G.  Rental Accommodation Guidelines  

1.  Narrow down on the suburbs you are interested in.
    
    Some obvious considerations:

-       Safe neighbourhoods

-       Your budget

-       Good school

-       Access to transport

-       Close to friends


2.   Finding a rental property 

There are two main Australian Real Estate web sites to help you set your budget and to know what is out there. 

http://www.realestate.com.au/rent

http://www.domain.com.au/?mode=rent

NOTE: Due to high demand, rental properties can disappear within 24 hours. Also, many properties listed on these sites are old listings which means they are no longer available.  


3.   Get your identification documents together for your rental application:

-       State proof of identity

-       Show current and previous residential history be it rental or ownership

-       Provide proof of income

-       Provide character references


4.   Securing the property

Rental properties are in great demand. The below site gives great tips on securing the property of your choice.

http://advice.realestateview.com.au/renting/how-to-put-your-best-foot-forward-and-secure-a-rental-property/

NOTE: Estate Agents can take more than one application, so make sure you submit complete and accurate information, so you don't lose out to someone else who's better prepared.


5.   Signing the lease and moving in

There's no standard for how much rent has to be paid in advance. Be prepared to pay the first fortnight/month's rent and a bond, usually for the amount of a month to six weeks' rent.

Familiarise yourself with do's and don'ts as a tenant:

http://www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au/biz_res/ftweb/pdfs/Tenants_and_home_owners/Starting_a_tenancy_information_for_tenants.pdf

 

6.   Choosing the most cost effective Electricity / Gas Retailer

Australian Government tool to help you compare electricity and gas plans, understand your energy bills and learn about energy consumer rights.

https://www.energymadeeasy.gov.au/